Fighting Alzheimer’s With New Drug Compound

Background

  • The tau protein allows the nervous system to operate normally.
  • Alzheimer’s disease is rooted in degeneration of neurons to the brain.
  • For some, toxic ‘tangles’ accumulate in the tau protein, and the brain loses synapses. This causes memory disorders to occur.

Via Washington University School Of Medicine

An encouraging article published by Tamara Bhandari details a synthetic molecule tested on mice and monkeys that fights against toxic tau proteins.

The findings suggest that the molecule – known as an antisense oligonucleotide – potentially could treat neurodegenerative diseases characterized by abnormal tau, including Alzheimer’s.

“We’ve shown that this molecule lowers levels of the tau protein, preventing and, in some cases, reversing the neurological damage,” said Timothy Miller, MD, PhD, the David Clayson Professor of Neurology and the study’s senior author. “This compound is the first that has been shown to reverse tau-related damage to the brain that also has the potential to be used as a therapeutic in people.”

Via St. Louis Business Journal

We first learned of this story through Diana Barr’s article in the St. Louis Business Journal’s Health Care section. Brooking Park anxiously awaits more details. Barr concludes,  “Human trials of oligonucleotides are underway for several other neurological diseases.”

Thank You, Washington University

On behalf of all the loved ones suffering from a devasting neurological disease worldwide, in the St. Andrew’s Network, or here at home at Brooking Park, we send our full support and gratitude for your research.

Brooking Park has been linked to Wash U in the past. Recently, the newly-developed Come Sing With Us program sang for the Brooking Park Memory Care unit. We’ve also been involved directly with School Of Medicine research through their KARE program.

Washington University Performs For Brooking Park’s Memory Care Household

08On behalf of our seniors, thank you to Washington University and their inspiring Arts & Sciences program for singing for Brooking Park’s Memory Care Household! Our residents formed the first ever live audience for many of the passionate student performers — we’re so honored!

Organizers Lynn Hamilton, Christine Armistead, and Jennifer Gartley developed the Come Sign With Us program to keep seniors diagnosed with dementia socially engaged. The last time Brooking Park collaborated with Washington University’s president of Maturity and Its Muse, Lynn Hamilton, was 2013, when Brooking Park residents participated in the KARE study (read more).

We often emphasize the therapeutic powers of music (see ‘Brooking Park’s Music Therapy Program Enriches Lives Of Older Adults‘). We look forward to the Spring performance and our community also hopes this “will be a continuing series of events that bring together seniors and music students.”

Pick up the latest copy of Wash U’s campus newspaper The Source, or enjoy Liam Otten’s lovely write up online here.

Brooking Park Participates in Study for Washington University

Chesterfield, Missouri (May 6, 2013) – Residents of Brooking Park participated in a study at Washington University’s Kemper Art Reaches Everyone {KARE} designed for adults with Alzheimer’s and their care partners. The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University offers the KARE program for adults with early to moderate Alzheimer’s and their care partners. The residents engaged with three to five pieces of art in the Museum’s galleries and then created a hands-on project inspired by the encounter. This program was developed in collaboration with Lynn Hamilton, president of Maturity and Its Muse, a not-for-profit with a mission to promote positive productive aging through the arts.

“It truly was an amazing experience for our residents to enjoy and participate in a program that is rather unique and held the attention for many individuals facing the challenge of Alzheimer’s every day. Our residents loved participating in this study and we look forward to next time” said Tatjana Pilakovic, Director of Activities at Brooking Park. “I watched their faces light up throughout the study and that brought a smile to my face” added Pilakovic.

The KARE program is free and available on select Mondays from 1:30 to 3:30 pm at Kemper Museum. For more information please contact Allison Taylor, manager of education programs, at alliston.taylor@wustl.edu or 314-935-7918.